POST R5 Online and Print Gazetteers

Print and online gazetteers provide the correct spelling!

PRINT:

Parish Registers East Prussia Part III by Kevan Hansen features the Gumbinnen Administrative District.

https://www.amazon.com/Kingdom-Prussia-Regierungsbezirk-Gumbinnen-Registers/dp/1628590203

There are reviews on other websites.

See also https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2015/12/04/east-prussian-gazetteers-part-i/

The Atlantic Bridge Volume 8 Prussia: Brandenberg, East Prussia, West Prussia, Pomerania, Posen by Charles M. Hall is an older publication, considered a Tier III resource by younger professional genealogists, but if family historians are to check every source, this volume serves as a backup and works well for East Prussia.

ONLINE:

FamilySearch

The description for each film in the FamilySearch Catalogue includes the correct spelling of the names of all the locations in the parish.

The FamilySearch Research Wiki provides articles about many East Prussian topics important to researchers.

https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Special:Search?search=East+Prussia&go=GO&searchToken=bckbtpax6v77onyuj133e99gu

The Gemeindelexikon für das Königreich Preußen: (auf Grund der Materialen der Volkszählung vom 1. Dezember 1905 und anderer amtlicher Quellen) print version is now online.

https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/14875?availability=Family%20History%20Library

https://dcms.lds.org/delivery/DeliveryManagerServlet?dps_pid=IE8436830

Kartenmeister

www.kartenmeister.com/

Kartenmeister is the most comprehensive database of its kind in the world. It contains 103,748 locations with over 45.115 name changes once. It is particularly good for East Prussia.

See also https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2014/10/30/kartenmeister/

Meyers-Orts

https://www.meyersgaz.org/

An online, searchable version of the Meyers Gazetteer of the German Empire with integrated historical maps is now available. Meyersgaz.org gives the correct spelling of any location.

Genealogy.net

Is a comprehensive super website

http://wiki-de.genealogy.net/Ostpreußen/Kirchenbücher

The GOV part of this website was discussed in

https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2018/07/29/gov-in-genealogy-net/

Much of the contents is updated here with additions and screen shots.

GOV provides “a unique worldwide place ID” and “includes the geographical location of a place (coordinates…on a map); key properties such as the postal code, previous or other names, and past administrative, legal, and religious affiliations. It also contains information about churches, parishes, towns, counties, and regions, etc.”

For East Prussia researchers, go to http://wiki-de.genealogy.net/Ostpreußen/Kirchenbücher

You can also search “ostpreussen kirchenbucher genealogy.net.”

The following screen shots provide an example of the contents of the 29 July 2018 G-GLISP post.

Select a Kreis from alphabetical list left of map; select the Kreis name; for that Kreis, select “Kirchenbuchbestände”; select a parish from alphabetical list left of map; select the parish name.

Across the yellow tool bar on the top you see the downward arrow pointing to GOV.

On the left you see an alphabetical listing of the kreis.

When I selected the one I was interested in, Kreis Pillkallen, this is what came up.

The historic gazetteer: http://gov.genealogy.net/search/name

I entered the name of a location in East Prussia I have been researching for family in Willuhnen. This is what appears, a map with locations of that place. I know it is not in northeast Poland. The one I want is in the Kalinigrad Oblast of Russia, formerly Gumbinnen Administrative District, East Prussia. (But if I did not know that, this map would help me determine where to look.)

And when you see the entire table, you see how much information is there.
http://gov.genealogy.net/search/name

Name, Typ (type), Ubergeordnete Objekte, Postleitzahl, GOV- Kennung.
Below that you see the legend.
Left arrow: I selected the cross, church records.
http://gov.genealogy.net/item/show/object_164365

 Superordinate Objects

http://gov.genealogy.net/item/show/object_164365

At the bottom of this page, under superordinate objects, is a listing of nearby locations.

The columns give me the names, the type, the GOV ID, and the time span.

I know that there was a church, but I have no dates…yet. I know it was a village from 1621 to 1945. I know there was a manor there from 1839 to 1945.

Not only was I interested in Willuhnen, but I was also interested in Wingern, a location I found on the microfilmed Willuhnen records. I now know that it was a rural municipality settlement in existence to 1907, but the dates of my records tell me it was there in the 1820s.

When I write my research, I can include these details with the correct source.

There is also a link for images, but there are none on this village, but sometimes you can find some by googling the name of your location under Google Images.

Once I had an understanding with print and online maps and gazetteers, I could continue.

At the bottom of this page, under superordinate objects, is a listing of nearby locations.

There is also a link for images, but there are none on this village, but sometimes you can find some by googling the name of your location under Google Images.

Once I had an understanding with print and online maps and gazetteers, I could continue.

Results for Willuhnen Church Records

On the left it gives me the GOV ID: the name, type, denomination, an article about this place in genealogy.net, and the geographic position.

On the right I see a regional map of its location and an outline of the object, as the location is called. I consider it an exact map.

Below that are links to other online maps like Bing, Google Earth, Google Maps, Wikimapia, etc.

The purple diagram, called the Superordinate object, shows a diagram of exactly what records are available and for what years.

The Historical Gazetteer is for other locations, not just East Prussia.

About suwalkigermans

I started family research in 1993. My first two books focused on my maternal grandparents. Both families came from Kreis Rosenberg, West Prussia, to Big Rapids, Michigan. I left the Spurgats from Wylkowiszki in the Russian Empire as the third book because of the difficult and challenging research it required. After I published the book in 2010, I wondered what to do next. I thought I might try to share some of my research with others and maybe at the same time, by going digital, someone would find me. When you read the comments, you will see that happened. The best part of all this is helping others.
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