Landsmen Updated Post 1

Earlier posts summarized articles of interest from the Suwalk-Lomza Interest Group.

https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2015/04/06/landsmen-suwalki-lomza-interest-group/

https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2015/04/27/landsmen-1994-1995/
https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2015/04/28/landsmen-1996-1997/
https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2015/05/01/landsmen-1998-to-2002/
https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2015/05/05/landsmen-2002/
https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2015/05/11/landsmen-2002-to-2004/
https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2015/05/18/landsmen-2004-to-2005/
https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2015/07/16/landsmen-2005-to-2011/
https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2015/07/31/landsmen-2005-to-2011-2/
https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2016/02/15/2016-landsmen-post-1/
https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2016/03/01/2016-landsmen-post-2/
https://suwalkigermans.wordpress.com/2016/03/16/2016-landsmen-post-3/

The next two posts bring the reader up to date on articles that may interest other researchers in what would become Suwalki Province in 1866.

Vol. 24 – Double Issue (March 2016) Special Section on Kalwaria: Part II. The editor’s overview provides a “Brief Historical Re-Cap” of Kalwaria in particular, but much of the same history relates to the nearby towns of Suwalki Province. As many times as I read the history of this area, I am always ready for a review. This article is an excellent refresher from the time of The Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth (1569 to 1795); New East Prussia (1795 to 1807); the Duchy of Warsaw under French control from 1808 to 1814; the Kingdom of Poland (aka Congress Poland and Russian Poland 1815 to 1918); to independent Lithuania starting in 1918.

Vol. 24 – Double Issue (March 2016) UK Naturalization Certificates on Ancestry.com by Jill Whitehead.
This interesting article discusses the pros and cons of online research. The author compares results of online records with paper copies she had researched earlier and enhanced her research with other UK sources, i. e. ten year censuses, birth, marriage and death records. She provides examples of how simply changing one letter of a town can alter the results, i. e. Kalvaria versus Kalwaria. She also provides examples of the same town listed as “Calvary.”
Another example is about a town I have recently become interested in: Vystitis (Lithuanian), Wiestieniec (Polish), and Wistitten (German.) Family Search provides three similar spellings: Vistytis, Vyshtynets, Wischtiten. Although almost all of the time, it was in Suwalki Province, in “the mid to late 19th century due to some border changes” it was in East Prussia and is now catalogued online in the Kaliningrad Oblast. It is this very issue we researchers in this area struggle with. By the way, FamilySearch did not recognize any of the first three spellings listed above. This article reminds researchers to access as many resources as you can.

Vol. 24 – Double Issue (March 2016) Short Takes: London the Baker and London the Congressman by Paul A. London, PhD.
This article centers on two men with the same name born in Vilkaviskis in the 19th century and their immigration to New York in 1870 and 1891. The author clearly explains his research that distinguishes each man from the other, one who became a Congressman in 1915. Of interest to researchers in this area is the mention of a visit to Vilkaviskis in July 2015, two years after I was there with my family history tour guide. The reader is given the name of the former director of the museum and a guide specializing in the history of the region, both with excellent recommendations.
Many stories about Napoleon’s army in Lithuania abound, and this article contains an interesting one with a likely family connection. This article might have escaped my notice had it not been for a brief article “More on Napoleon Stories” in the “Short Takes” in the January 2017 issue in which another researcher disputes Napoleon story in the above article. As researchers we are interested in both the family stories which can be proved and those which cannot be.

About suwalkigermans

I started family research in 1993. My first two books focused on my maternal grandparents. Both families came from Kreis Rosenberg, West Prussia, to Big Rapids, Michigan. I left the Spurgats from Wylkowiszki in the Russian Empire as the third book because of the difficult and challenging research it required. After I published the book in 2010, I wondered what to do next. I thought I might try to share some of my research with others and maybe at the same time, by going digital, someone would find me. When you read the comments, you will see that happened. The best part of all this is helping others.
This entry was posted in Articles, history, Landsmen articles, Resources, Suwalki Province and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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