Personal Recollections of Wylkowiszki

One family member and her two young sons, the eldest born in 1900 and the younger, born in 1906, remained in Wylkowiszki until 1908. Their father had left for the United States in May 1907. The oldest son born in 1900 recalled some of the incidents from his early life in an interview in July 1987 in his home.

As I remember, and I remember quite well, we lived two blocks from the marketplace. A street came down from the hill. Up above there was a big oval about one quarter mile in diameter where troops maneuvered. There were Jewish business places, taverns, and saloons around the oval. We were not abused at all while living there, but there were Jewish pogroms in 1905 and 1906 in Lamuhr, Shum, and Riga where the Jews were wiped out. Pa saved four Jewish girls. When he was asked if the Russian soldiers killed Jews, he replied, “Yes. Yes.” The Bolsheviks with their red flags were in existence in 1904. The Mensheviks had the black flags. One day when the soldiers came, I was in the creek or the river with my cousins. We wanted to take cover. The bridge was one block away. They started shooting. We ran away down the river. We were locked up for a couple days. (1)

(1) Interview by his younger brother, 4 July 1987. Transcript held by the author. Both are now deceased.

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About suwalkigermans

I started family research in 1993. My first two books focused on my maternal grandparents. Both families came from Kreis Rosenberg, West Prussia, to Big Rapids, Michigan. I left the Spurgats from Wylkowiszki in the Russian Empire as the third book because of the difficult and challenging research it required. After I published the book in 2010, I wondered what to do next. I thought I might try to share some of my research with others and maybe at the same time, by going digital, someone would find me. When you read the comments, you will see that happened. The best part of all this is helping others.
This entry was posted in Families, history, Interviews, Suwalki Province, Uncategorized, Villages and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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