The Spellings of the Names of the Villages

The names of the villages the Spurgat families lived in or lived nearby also varied according to the governmental jurisdiction. The most common spellings are listed below.

Polish

German

Lithuanian

Dydwiże, Didwiże Dydwiz Dydvyziai
Garszwinie, Garszwinia Garszwiny, Garszwinie Garsviniai
Gize Gize Gizai
Gudele Gudele Gudeliai
Iskarty Iskarti
Kisieniszki
Korale Korale Karaliai
Kybarty Kybartai
Mariampol Mariampol/Mariampolu Marijampole
Massykwietyszki, Mazkwietyszki
Obszurty
Pilviszki Pilwischken Pilviskiai
Procopol Procopole
Purwiniszki
Pustopedzie
Rumaki, Rumak Rumaki Romokai
Szelwy
Wierzbołow, Verzhbolov Wershbolowo, Wirballen Virbalis
Wylkowiszki, Wylkowyszki,   Wolkowyski, Wilkowiszki, Volkov Wilkowischen,

Wilkowischken

Vilkaviskis
Zielonka Zelenka Zalioji

A map in a future post will show the locations of most of these villages and a list of events in the Spurgat families connected with them.

The nearby town of Eydtkuhnen, East Prussia, now called Černyševskoje in Russian, was the closest border crossing and may have a connection to this family. The German “Eydtkuhnen” is spelled as “Eitkūnai” in Lithuanian. Sometimes the spelling, “Eydkuhnen”,  is also seen.

These families with the –at names are often thought to be  German because of their religion and their language. Because many of them did not read or write, it is likely that they never saw the name of their village spelled in the German alphabet as they lived in the Kingdom of Poland, a protectorate of the Russian Empire.

The posts about the -at names is complete at this time. Future posts will include maps of help to the researcher of the -at names.

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About suwalkigermans

I started family research in 1993. My first two books focused on my maternal grandparents. Both families came from Kreis Rosenberg, West Prussia, to Big Rapids, Michigan. I left the Spurgats from Wylkowiszki in the Russian Empire as the third book because of the difficult and challenging research it required. After I published the book in 2010, I wondered what to do next. I thought I might try to share some of my research with others and maybe at the same time, by going digital, someone would find me. When you read the comments, you will see that happened. The best part of all this is helping others.
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